Afghanistan

Lack of funds threatens UN food aid to millions of vulnerable Afghans

 15 April 2011 – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) said today it urgently needs $257 million to continue providing food and assistance to over 7 million vulnerable Afghans, most of whom are women and children.

UN-backed de-worming campaign targets millions of Afghan children

20 October 2010 – Millions of Afghan children will be protected against malnutrition, retarded growth and development and poor learning ability under a United Nations-backed de-worming campaign launched in schools across the country today.
The Education and Health Ministries, supported by the UN World Health Organization (WHO), UN World Food Programme (WFP) and UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), plan to reach every school-going child with a single 500 milligramme tablet of Mebendazole, consumed simply by chewing or swallowing with a glass of water.

The tablets will be administered through Education Ministry outreach workers and complemented by health and hygiene education programmes in schools.

unicef: afghanistan 2009

Fiche Year: 
2009
International Community responses sorted by CFA outcomes
Emergency /food assistance, nutrition and safety nets (1.1): 
UNICEF: HELLO Samir, stefano, michelle

UN health agency rushing medical help to flood-hit Afghans

5 August 2010 – The United Nations health agency said today that it has begun sending medical supplies to aid thousands of people affected by recent flooding across Afghanistan, where the major health concerns right now are water contamination and the spread of waterborne diseases.

“WHO is supporting the Government response to the health needs of people affected by flooding through distributing emergency medical assistance in the provinces that have been worst affected by the ongoing floods, ensuring that the urgent health needs of the Afghan people are met,” said Peter Graaff, the representative of the World Health Organization (WHO) in Afghanistan.

“As flooding continues, WHO stands prepared to immediately respond to the worsening health crisis,” he added.

Afghanistan: 2009: wfp

Fiche Year: 
2009
International Community responses sorted by CFA outcomes
Emergency /food assistance, nutrition and safety nets (1.1): 
vouchers (based on seasonality) to be undertaken as part of the price rise mitigation strategy while focused on strengthening individual livelihood assets and productive land management. Construction or rehabilitation of traditional irrigation systems (canals and karezes), integrated with other land and water
Smallholder farmer food production sustained (1.2; 2.2): 
WB: $70 million in planned IDA projects to support (i) rural enterprise development, and (ii) the national solidarity program
Trade/tax policies and macro-economics (1.3; 1.4): 
IMF: The current US$120 million PRGF-supported arrangement continues until 2010. A successor arrangement could be negotiated in early 2010. A joint-IMF-World Bank assessment of progress towards completion point under the Heavily Indebted Poor Country (HIPC) initiative is also being conducted. After the HIPC completion point, Afghanistan stands to benefit from nearly 100 percent debt relief under the HIPC and MDRI initiatives.
Social protection systems (2.1) : 
##############
Food markets improved (2.3): 
FAO:Continued support to collect and disseminate local market information though FAAHM potential by HLTF members sorted by CFA outcomes (USD 3.7 million)
Continued support potential by HLTF members sorted by CFA outcomes
Emergency /food assistance, nutrition and safety nets (1.1): 
WFP: Productive Safety Net programmes through FFW, CFW or vouchers (based on seasonality) to be undertaken as part of the price rise mitigation strategy while focused on strengthening individual livelihood assets and productive land management. Construction or rehabilitation of traditional irrigation systems (canals and karezes), integrated with other land and water management interventions (est. USD 35 million).
Smallholder farmer food production sustained (1.2; 2.2): 
# WB: $70 million in planned IDA projects to support (i) rural enterprise development, and (ii) the national solidarity program # *** agency 4 *** WFP: New PRRO will support a variety of productive assets such as: (i) integrated response to raise agricultural productivity and resilience to shocks and encourage sustainable land use practices within watersheds; (ii) integrate WFP’s purchasing power with the technical expertise of other partners to help connect farmers to markets and raise their incomes; (iii) development of human capital through school based interventions and training programmes; and (iv) Improve people’s access to basic social services and nutrition through supplementary feeding, flour fortification and TB patient incentives. The overall cost for WFP activities under these components is US$ 80 million ($35.3 for FFA, $11.6 for Strategic Grain Reserve, $2.75 for P4P, $7.12 for Cash & Vouchers and $23.23 for urban safety nets
Trade/tax policies and macro-economics (1.3; 1.4): 
The current US$120 million PRGF-supported arrangement continues until 2010. A successor arrangement could be negotiated in early 2010. A joint-IMF-World Bank assessment of progress towards completion point under the Heavily Indebted Poor Country (HIPC) initiative is also being conducted. After the HIPC completion point, Afghanistan stands to benefit from nearly 100 percent debt relief under the HIPC and MDRI initiatives.
Food markets improved (2.3): 
FAO:Continued support to collect and disseminate local market information though FAAHM potential by HLTF members sorted by CFA outcomes (USD 3.7 million)

Afghanistan, 2009

Fiche Year: 
2009
  • Population: 25.067 million (2005) (Source: UNDP-HDR 2007/2008). It is however important to stress that there has not been a full census done since 1979. As such, it is difficult to have reliable figures on the population and different sources refer to different figures.
  • GNI or GDP: USD 11,709 million (2008/09) (Source: IMF)
  • ODA: USD 2992.72 million (2007 Source: OECD)
  • HDI Ranking: 181/182 (UNDP –statistical update 2009)
Government Responses: 
  • Poor food consumption: + 16% increase in households since 2006. An additional est. 2.5 million people (1.4 million in rural areas and 1.14 million in urban areas) require food assistance. The number of people not meeting their minimum daily kilocalories intake has increased since 2005, but still 35% of the population currently does not meet its food needs in terms of calories and 46% in terms of dietary diversity. 31% of the Afghan population is food insecure, while 23% of the population is considered borderline food insecure. Breaking the numbers down, the food insecure or borderline insecure are 24% urban, 39% rural, and 46% Kuchi (nomads).
  • Severe food access problems: 29% of households face severe food access problems.
    Reportedly, in June 2009, households in the west-central part of the country spent more than 75% of their incomes on food, while the average national proportion of income spent on food is 67
  • Most Vulnerable: displaced people; returning refugees and deported migrants; female-headed households and war widows; the nomadic Kuchis; disabled heads of households and the chronically poor. UNAMA Human Rights/OHCHR’s 2009 right to food monitoring project found that women (and not necessarily female-headed households, but females in families where the men have good access to adequate food) have disproportionate access to adequate food, even if the household is not considered vulnerable.

Agriculture:

  • Rehabilitation of irrigation and water management;
  • Improvements in input supplies (certified seeds and fertilizers) and extension;
  • Raising agricultural productivity and resilience to shocks (integrated natural resource management approaches, sustainable land use practices within watersheds, etc
  • Capacity building of government staff working on the Government planned Strategic Grain Reserve in areas frequently affected by natural disasters by rehabilitating and reconstructing silos and regional warehouses with equipment for proper food storage and handling.
  • Assistance with the establishment of community based storage facilities is needed, to help reduce the post-harvest losses as well as maximize selling prices.
  • Additionally integration of smallholder and low income farmers into the market through the purchase of their produces at remunerative prices for food assistance operations.
  • Support to establish private sector processing plants which will use local produce for the production of fortified biscuits and blended food.
  • Provision of affordable microfinance products and services;
  • Improvements in access to animal vaccines and veterinary services;
  • Improvements in land tenure rights and the management of common property resources;
  • Promoting investments in wheat storage and milling capacity in the private sector;
  • Need for promotion of agricultural production, infrastructure and change from illicit to licit crops as well as support to sustainable development of local food security systems and the country’s capacity to reduce hunger;
  • Cut post-harvest losses and Integrated Pest Management.

Safety nets:

  • Afghanistan currently lacks a well-developed safety net system. Initially, system design should develop a basic structure consistent with the country’s administrative and fiscal capacity, paying explicit attention to targeting and delivery mechanisms.
  • Subsequent safety net program implementation should include the development of institutional capacity, payment systems, staffing/administrative arrangements, and public information campaigns.

Elements for strategic response:

  • Encourage production of high-value, income elastic export commodities (major dried fruits and nuts) to spur agricultural income;
  • Ensure reliable power, water supplies, transport;
  • Improve security of land tenure and access to unutilized government land;
  • Develop a National Sustainable Land Management Framework centered on community-based integrated watershed development ;
  • Engage in developing a national strategy on social protection;
  • Improve access to market through access to inputs, local purchases and capacity building
  • Improved access to financial services especially for smallholders;
  • Improved agriculture and livestock extension service system;
  • Improve access to quality agriculture inputs;
  • Affordable communications networks
  • Gender aspects of access to food
  • Improved accountability and access to justice; Abuse of power (no functional judicial system, land use, access to markets etc), corruption (food aid), discrimination (women’s access etc), and lack of person security all affect the enjoyment of the right to food

Government actions and planned actions:

  • The Government efforts are guided by the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS) and the recently launched National Agriculture Development Framework (NADF)
  • In Afghanistan’s 2008/09 budget, US$20 million is set aside as contingency fund for emergencies
  • Lowered the tariff on wheat imports from 2.5 % to zero, and reduced tax on staple food items.
  • Earmarked US$50 million to buy and import food items from regional markets
  • Government-to-government contracts are being negotiated to import wheat from Pakistan and Kazakhstan.
  • The Government has increased efforts of procuring food both locally and regionally. Following the drought and high food price crisis in 2008, the Government sought to purchase significant quantities of wheat from neighboring countries in order to respond to immediate needs and establish the beginning of a strategic grain reserve. In 2009, following a strong harvest, the Government also began to purchase food locally for the same purposes.
  • The Government wants to establish a strategic grain reserve.
  • The Government has expressed strong interest in scaling up irrigation investments.
  • Expanding the agricultural regeneration plan through distribution of subsidized improved seeds, fertilizers and insecticides.
  • Comprehensive Agriculture and Rural Development
  • Emergency Horticulture and Livestock Programmed (EHLP)
  • Expand the number of seed enterprises and increase availability of improved wheat seed.
  • Distribution of 27,000MT of improved wheat seed together with fertilizer to 550,000 farmers (joint program with partners).
International Community: 

Joint UN system response:

Two Joint Emergency Appeals were made during 2008; the first in January 2008 which was fully funded. The second was in July 2008, to cover the period August 2008 to July 2009. In January 2009, the appeal was folded into the Humanitarian Action Plan (HAP). The second appeal was also largely covered and the HAP is currently about 66.4% funded (UNOCHA).Rapid appraisal (under EC) was conducted in October 2008

Short-term measures:

  • Identifying the most vulnerable areas and groups
  • Scaling up existing safety net programs such as the cash voucher programme or in-kind food assistance, particularly in urban areas
  • Private sector involvement in the wheat trade
  • Refocusing the existing food-for-assets programme on activities that improve both agricultural production and productivity through an integrated watershed management approach.
  • Capitalize on the private sector involvement in the grain market through the Purchase for Progress (P4P) initiative.
  • Establishment of strategic grain reserves at local and national levels while linking supply side interventions in agriculture with social services such as building irrigation infrastructure and schools/classrooms while ensuring access by the most vulnerable through cash/food wages and food for education programs

Medium/longer-term policies

  • Safety nets, including targeted cash transfers to vulnerable people via:
    • (i) a targeting system;
    • (ii) cash payment mechanism;
    • (iii) administrative capacity;
    • (iv) fiscally sustainable resources;
    • (v) incentives/co-responsibility through cash-for-work or other conditional cash transfer programs; and
    • (vi) Strong leadership and effective governance.
  • Improve the functioning of already existing systems and, building on experience with food-for-work, transform these into cash-for-work programs, suitable for responding to emergencies.
  • Liberalize domestic trade and improve domestic food distribution networks.
  • Stimulate food supply of food while interlinking agriculture-market-safety net opportunities:
    • Improve wheat productivity through investments in irrigation, seed, fertilizer, mechanization, and agricultural research and extension.
    • Increase production of higher-value cash crops, providing the rural population with more cash income and through safety nets, promote income generation measures, and increase purchasing power to buy wheat for their consumption.
Continued Support: 

Continued Support potential by HLTF members sorted by CFA outcomes

Further Pledges: 

Further commitments/pledges/investment from international community

Comment: 

75 per cent of the Government’s budget is from external aid, over which the Government has no control, but is rather disbursed by donors. This inevitably affects the Government’s decision-making power over how resources are used. This has formed part of the critique around the Government’s agricultural policy, considered by some to be donor driven, resulting in an incoherent policy and dominated by an agribusiness approach which risks being to the detriment of small farmers

Greater efforts needed to protect health of Afghans, says senior UN official

26 April 2010 – A senior United Nations official today called for greater efforts to assist Afghans, who remain extremely vulnerable to a wide range of health challenges associated with natural disasters, conflict and the lack of coverage of health services.

“Much has been achieved in recent years to expand health care in many parts of the country, but we still see today that many Afghans remain extremely vulnerable to a wide range of humanitarian emergencies, and more needs to be done to protect them,” Dr. Eric Laroche, the Assistant Director-General for Health Action in Crises of the World Health Organization (WHO), told a news conference in the capital, Kabul.

UN aid efforts under way in quake-hit northern Afghanistan

20 April 2010 – The United Nations humanitarian wing is coordinating emergency aid and assessing the damage in northern Afghanistan following a 5.3-magnitude earthquake that reportedly killed at least seven people and injured dozens of others.

The quake hit the mountainous Samangan province, northwest of the capital, Kabul, on Monday.

Aid workers are on the scene trying to assess the extent of the casualties and the destruction in the districts of Dara-i-Sufi Bala, Dara-i-Sufi Payin and Ruyi du Ab, but some access had been blocked due to the damage.

An estimated 2,000 houses are damaged or destroyed, according to the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). Livestock and goods were also lost.

2009 afghanistan: unicef

Fiche Year: 
2009
International Community responses sorted by CFA outcomes
Emergency /food assistance, nutrition and safety nets (1.1): 
fgdsgsgs s dsgsd dsg sgsdf g
Smallholder farmer food production sustained (1.2; 2.2): 
dsfg dfsg sdgsd dsgf
Trade/tax policies and macro-economics (1.3; 1.4): 
dg sdgsd g
Social protection systems (2.1) : 
ert sdrt er
Food markets improved (2.3): 
tert esrt er
Continued support potential by HLTF members sorted by CFA outcomes
Emergency /food assistance, nutrition and safety nets (1.1): 
df dfsg dsfgdsf
Smallholder farmer food production sustained (1.2; 2.2): 
sd gdsfg dsfg sd
Trade/tax policies and macro-economics (1.3; 1.4): 
df gdsf gdsg sd
Social protection systems (2.1): 
dfg dsfg sdfg
Food markets improved (2.3): 
d sdfgds gdfg

World Bank Supports Afghanistan’s Efforts to Boost Rural Employment, Incomes

Press Release No:2010/290/SAR

WASHINGTON, March 09, 2010 ? The World Bank today approved a $30 million IDA grant to support a new initiative by the Government of Afghanistan designed to boost employment and incomes for people living in rural areas of the country.

The Afghanistan Rural Enterprise Development Project (AREDP) will enhance participation of the rural poor in economic activities by providing business development services, improving their access to finance, and strengthening market linkages and value chains.

Syndicate content

Back to top

© 2011 United Nations | About this portal